To be a player in the field of city development, a spatial strategist needs to understand the rules of the game. The design lab Project Rotterdam focuses on giving the students of the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture and Urban Design a basic understanding of: “Who owns what?” “Who pays and what are each responsibilities, powers and ambitions?”

 

Project Rotterdam

The design lab is part of the Studio: Project Rotterdam (teachers Jeroen Zuidgeest (MVRDV) and Jean-Paul Hitipeuw (Urban CODES)) that is taking place at the Rotterdam Academy of Architecture and Urban Design. This Studio will evaluate the “Map of the City”, as developed by the municipality in 2015, and define an updated “New Map of the City”. The studio will search for the spatially non-addressed projects that hold either high potential or risks, and translate them in strategies and projects for the ‘upgrade’ of Rotterdam. In order to do so, the studio will hereby explicitly challenge the architect or urban designer to take up the role of spatial strategist.

 

projectrdam01

 

Spatial Strategist

Next to his or her design skills, a spatial strategist needs to understand the rules of the game to be a player in the field of city development. Basic understanding of: “Who owns what?” “Who pays and what are each responsibilities, powers and ambitions?” are essential for the student to be a spatial strategist and deliver a detail development strategy, feasibility and architectural proposals at the end of the studio. Therefore the design lab (teacher David Dooghe) will focus on giving insights on these specific questions and by doing so, question and support the student in the expected spatial strategist role.

 

Design lab products

LAB Koen Niek

 

Stakeholder analysis, presentation Koen van den Dungen en Niek van der Putten 

 

Stakeholder analysis: the different stakeholders within the urban development of Rotterdam were defined and their specific responsibilities, powers and ambitions for Rotterdam were visualised.

Debate: What is the playing field and what are the frictions between responsibilities, powers or ambition of the different public or private players in the field? By means of debate among students, the students learned more on the other players in urban development and learned to formulate arguments.

 

Results

Each student ended the design lab with two stakeholder proposals on how their design project could be developed. The proposals were distinctive in who pays or takes the lead in the project. Next to mapping the stakeholders, they looked into how they would position themselves as a spatial strategist in both proposals in order for the project to benefit the most. By comparing, they formulated pro and con arguments.